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DID 1/6 SCALE WWII GERMAN JOHANN BOXED ACTION FIGURE, U-BOAT STABSOBER MECHANIKER / STABSBOOTSMANN, CHARCTER FROM THE MOVIE 'DAS BOOT', D80149

DID 1/6 SCALE WWII GERMAN JOHANN BOXED ACTION FIGURE, U-BOAT STABSOBER MECHANIKER / STABSBOOTSMANN, CHARCTER FROM THE MOVIE 'DAS BOOT', D80149


 
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NO COUPON CODES ON THIS ITEM
THIS IS A PRE-ORDER & ISN'T IN-STOCK
U.S. Customer Price $189.99
U.S. Pre-Order Price $179.99
International Customer Price: $179.99
Savings: $10.00

Quantity in Stock:7

Availability:: Pre-Order
Product Code: D80149
Qty:

Product Scale Pre Order
 
One Sixth Scale

THIS IS A PRE-ORDER & IS NOT IN-STOCK!!! THE RELEASE DATE FOR THIS PRODUCT IS JUNE 2021!!!!

***This figure is a Pre-Order and we will not honor any coupon codes for this product.***



Product Description
DID 1/6 SCALE WWII GERMAN JOHANN BOXED ACTION FIGURE
U-BOAT STABSOBER MECHANIKER / STABSBOOTSMANN, CHARACTER FROM THE MOVIE 'DAS BOOT'
PRODUCT NUMBER D80149
COMPLETE FIGURE BOXED/UNOPENED
BOX IS IN EXCELLENT CONDITION
NOTES: No Notes.

DISCLAIMER: OUR PRODUCTS ARE FOR ADULTS ONLY, NOT CHILDREN. OUR PRODUCTS ARE FOR HISTORIC EDUCATION PURPOSES ONLY, AND ARE NOT INTENDED TO GLORIFY, NOR EXPLOIT THE HORRORS AND ATROCITIES OF WAR.

D80149 part list
Base:
1 Super realistic headsculpt
2 Body
3 Open palms
4 Relax palms
5 Palms for holding morse lamp
Outfits
6 German Kriegsmarine U-Boat officer's visor cap
7 German Kriegsmarine U-Boat side cap
8 German Kriegsmarine officer uniform and pants
9 German Kriegsmarine foul weather U-Boat deck jacket (genuine leather)
10 German Kriegsmarine foul weather U-Boat deck pants (genuine leather)
11 Life jacket
12 Blue sweater
13 Grey shirt with black tie
14 Plaid shirt
15 Plaid scarf
16 Grey gloves
17 Shoes
18 Boots (genuine leather)
Accessories
19 Morse lamp
20 Binoculars
21 U-Boat goggles
22 Boatswain's whistle
23 Cigarette
24 Stopwatch
25 Watch
26 DID buttonhook
Insignia
27 The straps of German Kriegsmarine Stabsober Mechaniker X 2 pairs
28 Insignias for German Kriegsmarine Stabsbootsmann X 1 pair
29 German Kriegsmarine officers breast eagle X 1
30 U-Boat combat clasp in sliver X1
31 German Kriegsmarine U-Boat badge X 1
32 Kriegsmarine minesweeper badge X1
33 Iron Cross 1st class X1
Insignia (U-Boat Crews)
34 U-96 U-Boat Cap Badge
35 U-972 U-Boat Cap Badge
36 U-74 U-Boat Cap Badge

More on German U-Boats:


During WWII, U-boat warfare was the major component of the Battle of the Atlantic, which began in 1939 and ended with Germany's surrender in 1945. The Armistice of 11 November 1918 ending WWI had scuttled most of the old Imperial German Navy and the subsequent Treaty of Versailles of 1919 limited the surface navy of Germany's new Weimar Republic to only six battleships (of less than 10,000 tons each), six cruisers, and 12 destroyers. To compensate, Germany's new navy, the Kriegsmarine, developed the largest submarine fleet going into World War II. British Prime Minister Winston Churchill later wrote "The only thing that really frightened me during the war was the U-boat peril."

In the early stages of the war the U-boats were extremely effective in destroying Allied shipping due to the large gap in mid-Atlantic air cover. Cross-Atlantic trade in war supplies and food was extensive and critical for Britain's survival. The continuous action surrounding British shipping became known as the Battle of the Atlantic, as the British developed technical defences such as ASDIC & radar, and the German U-boats responded by hunting in what were called "wolfpacks" where multiple submarines would stay close together, making it easier for them to sink a specific target. Britain's vulnerable shipping situation existed until 1942, when the tides changed as the U.S. merchant marine and Navy entered the war, drastically increasing the amount of tonnage of supplies sent across the Atlantic. The combination of increased tonnage and increased naval protection of shipping convoys made it much more difficult for U-boats to make a significant dent in British shipping. Once the United States entered the war, U-boats ranged from the Atlantic coast of the United States and Canada to the Gulf of Mexico, and from the Arctic to the west and southern African coasts and even as far east as Penang. The U.S. military engaged in various tactics against German incursions in the Americas; these included military surveillance of foreign nations in Latin America, particularly in the Caribbean, to deter any local governments from supplying German U-boats.

Because speed and range were severely limited underwater while running on battery power, U-boats were required to spend most of their time surfaced running on diesel engines, diving only when attacked or for rare daytime torpedo strikes. The more ship-like hull design reflects the fact that these were primarily surface vessels that could submerge when necessary. This contrasts with the cylindrical profile of modern nuclear submarines, which are more hydrodynamic underwater (where they spend the majority of their time), but less stable on the surface. While U-boats were faster on the surface than submerged, the opposite is generally true of modern submarines. The most common U-Boat attack during the early years of the war was conducted on the surface and at night. This period, before the Allied forces developed truly effective antisubmarine warfare tactics, which included convoys, was referred to by German submariners as "die gl├╝ckliche Zeit" or the First Happy Time.


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